PHONE AND VIDEO CONFERENCING CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE

Call 24/7 For A FREE Consultation
Click to call
513-721-1077

The seasoned legal team at Gregory S. Young Co., LPA, has protected the rights of injured persons since 1958.

Personal Injury

Learn More

Premises Liability

Learn More

Motor Vehicle Accidents

Learn More

Truck Accidents

Learn More

Wrongful Death

Learn More

Dog Bites

Learn More

Other Accidents & Injuries

Learn More

Archives

Why are motorcyclists more likely to be injured in a crash?

| Oct 5, 2016 | Motorcycle Accidents

As previous posts have mentioned, a motorcycle lacks the crash worthiness and occupant protection that other motor vehicles do in event of an accident. Automobiles offer seatbelts, airbags, roofs and have more weight, making it more difficult to overturn than a motorcycle. A motorcycle, due to its lesser weight, has more maneuverability and the ability to stop faster than other vehicles, but its size makes it more difficult to see by other motorists on the road and its lack of protection makes it more likely that a motorcyclist will die in a motorcycle accident. Around 80 percent of motorcycle crashes result in the death or injury to the motorcyclist.

In most motorcycle crashes-two-thirds, according to some sources-the other vehicle caused the accident by violating the motorcyclist’s right of way. Some sources attribute one-third of all motorcycle crashes to the fact that other drivers turn into the way of the motorcyclist. Why do motorists do this? Because of visual recognition-motorcycles are smaller targets and are easily hidden behind other vehicles, especially at intersections. In fact, most crashes involving motorcycles take place at intersections.

When a crash does take place, motorcyclists are 26 times more likely to die compared to a person riding or driving in the passenger car. The statistic can be startling for many Ohio residents, especially those whose loved ones regularly enjoy riding a motorcycle. A few precautions on the side of both motorists and motorcyclists may go a long way in reducing crashes, such as stopping at an intersection and checking for all traffic, staying outside of the blind spot of motorists and driving carefully when the roads are slippery or wet.

Despite taking these precautions, it is possible that crashes still take place, due to no fault of the motorcyclist. When this happens, families are often overcome with grief and questions-why wasn’t the other driver more careful and what will happen now? Although there are no substantial answers to these questions, holding the negligent driver liable for causing a fatal motorcycle accident could go a long way in helping families come to terms with their loss.

Archives