PHONE AND VIDEO CONFERENCING CONSULTATIONS AVAILABLE

Call 24/7 For A FREE Consultation
Click to call
513-721-1077

The seasoned legal team at Gregory S. Young Co., LPA, has protected the rights of injured persons since 1958.

Personal Injury

Learn More

Premises Liability

Learn More

Motor Vehicle Accidents

Learn More

Truck Accidents

Learn More

Wrongful Death

Learn More

Dog Bites

Learn More

Other Accidents & Injuries

Learn More

Archives

Identifying PTSD symptoms after a motor vehicle accident

| Nov 11, 2020 | Car Accidents

The sounds, the smells, the pain and the trauma related to a motor vehicle accident can linger for a crash victim for weeks, months and even years. You have been through a horrific experience. While the physical injuries may heal and leave scars, you still have a great deal of healing to do on the inside when recovering from emotional distress.

In such scenarios, you may be experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A terrifying motor vehicle accident may have taken a toll on your mental health, triggering nightmares, anxiety and flashbacks. Such psychological jolts require immediate attention, so it is crucial that you seek guidance from a therapist or counselor.

Anxiety, depression and fear

PTSD can affect your life in so many ways. You no longer are interested in doing the things you enjoyed. You are frightened and fearful, while suddenly subscribing to a life of avoidance. You no longer feel like working, you avoid social and family functions. And you especially avoid getting anywhere near where the accident occurred. Finally, fearing déjà vu, you no longer drive

The symptoms from PTSD also can also lead to strained personal relationships. You cannot live like this anymore. Here are some signs that you are suffering from PTSD after a motor vehicle accident:

  • Anxiety: This emotion surfaces in several ways, including tenseness, nervousness, fear, extreme worry and apprehension.
  • Depression: Overcoming what seems to be a permanent sadness can be difficult. You may ask, “Why did this happen to me?” But you should focus on “How do I overcome this?”
  • Fearfulness: Suddenly, sounds, voices and cries can trigger fear. It stays with you, preventing you from being whole again.
  • Insomnia: Body, mind and spirit must work together to function. If just one is out of whack, you face challenges such as the inability to sleep.
  • Loss of appetite: Your emotional well-being is far from recovering. With the loss of appetite, your physical well-being continues to be affected as well.
  • Recurring nightmares: Along with uncontrollable thoughts about the crash, nightmares torment you.

Gradual steps are necessary to recover from PTSD, which can be triggered by a terrible motor vehicle accident. Your body, mind and spirit received a major shock from which you may require a lengthy time to recover. But you can do this. Focus on what is in front of you.

Archives